Gallic Wars Battle Simulator Review (Xbox Series S)

For our Gallic Wars Battle Simulator Review, we decide it’s time to conquer ROME! As we command our band of merry Gallic Warriors and destroy the Roman Empire in this Rouge-like strategy game.

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Gallic Wars Battle Simulator Review Pros:

  • Nice cartoon graphics.
  • 935.9MB download size.
  • 1000 Gamerscore.
  • Initial tutorial with the option to replay.
  • Pointer speed – 1 to 5.
  • Strategy roguelike gameplay.
  • Uses classic RTS control style and game mechanics.
  • The map will randomly generate battles and you choose which one to play, you cannot replay them.
  • Roguelike in the sense that anyone who dies is gone, the map changes every game.
  • You can group soldiers together and assign them to a color banner.
  • Lose all soldiers and it’s game over.
  • You have full control over how many units to play or not play in a battle.
  • The game flow has a planning and fighting phase. You do not control anyone after the game starts.
  • You earn resources after a victory.
  • Each battle on the map will show enemy unit numbers and rewards before you play.
  • When you advance your army (go up a set of squares) you get all your units back.
  • Three soldier types – warrior, shield guy, and archers.
  • Each victory will grant more soldiers.
  • You can hide in bushes.
  • Matches are quick.
  • Heroes – you earn these by playing and are permanent. You can equip up to four for a campaign run and grant buffs and abilities.
  • Full camera control.
  • You can lay down bushes, build traps and deploy catapults.
  • As you advance you get more enemy troops to fight.
  • Once it clicks it is a solid game.

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Gallic Wars Battle Simulator Review Cons:

  • Doesn’t explain that any deployed soldiers are lost unavailable even if you win.
  • Quite a high learning curve.
  • Takes a long time to get going.
  • No word on all the hero unlocks.
  • Feels basic.
  • Enemy difficulties wildly vary.
  • No set difficulties option.
  • Controls feel clunky and when concerning the dropping of items, it doesn’t explain how to do any of it.
  • Cannot rebind controls.
  • Just the one army.
  • Music is the same all the time.
  • A handy text pop-up over items and buttons would help a lot.

Related Post: Red Solstice 2 Survivors Review (Steam)

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Gallic Wars Battle Simulator:

Official website.

Developer: Mad Gamesmith

Publisher: Gaming Factory S.A

Store Links –

Xbox

Nintendo

Steam

  • 7/10
    Graphics - 7/10
  • 6/10
    Sound - 6/10
  • 6/10
    Accessibility - 6/10
  • 7/10
    Length - 7/10
  • 7/10
    Fun Factor - 7/10
6.6/10

Summary

Strategy games are all the rage at the moment as people tend to have a lot more time for them, in Gallic Wars Battle Simulator takes the genre through a roguelike filter whereby soldiers you use or lose are gone until you can advance on the map, you unlock heroes from playing and they are permanent and offer game-changing advancements like crafting or more health, etc. You start off on a tutorial but to be honest even that was a bit of a chore as it didn’t explain things clearly or help with learning the very confusing controls. That is the main theme running through Gallic Wars Battle Simulator, it’s confusing and slow to learn. You constantly feel like you are the last to know anything, it took a good solid few hours to grasp (work out myself) what I had to do. Once it all fell into place I did enjoy the gameplay part as it very RTS orientated, the unlock of heroes was good but not enough, rewards are stingy and the Ai difficultly is so up and down it all makes for an unsettling experience. I say give it a try but it plays like it wants to be something g else and leaves you to try and figure it out on your own for very little reward or satisfaction.

Jim Smale

Gaming since the Atari 2600, I enjoy the weirdness in games counting Densha De Go and RC De Go as my favourite titles of all time. I prefer gaming of old where buying games from a shop was a thing, Being social in person was a thing. Join me as I attempt to adapt to this new digital age!

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