Tennis World Tour 2 Review (Xbox Series S)

Tennis World Tour 2 Review (Xbox Series S)

Play as the world’s top players, master each surface, perfect your game and strive to dominate the world circuit. Choose from multiple game modes, with singles and doubles games, local and online.

Pros:

  • Nice graphics.
  • 12.6GB download size.
  • 1000 Gamerscore.
  • Tennis gameplay.
  • Five modes-Exhibition, career, tournament, online and tennis school.
  • My player-full in-depth player customisation/creator.
  • Tennis school-learn how to play with lessons on basics, movement, charging, aiming, serving and more advanced techniques with a series of challenges to hone them all further.
  • Online-leagues, e-sports, quick match and custom match. Online also has rotating objectives (optional) for coin rewards.
  • Store-buy card packs with earned coins.
  • Four career difficulties-future’s, challengers, worlds and grand slam. These determine match length and if you can replay matches.
  • Cards-you equip 5 and each one grants a use limit and will increase stats/techniques.
  • Career, create a character, pick what activities/events you do via the calendar, you can play or simulate matches.
  • Tournaments-the break tens, custom, Roland Garros, Mutua Madrid Open, and Halle open.
  • Official player names and venues.
  • 48 players both male and female.
  • Shots are played out via timing and power, you can hold down a button to charge the shot for example.

Tennis World Tour 2 Review (Xbox Series S)

Cons:

  • Wooden almost robotic looking character models.
  • The power and aiming of shots are needlessly complicated and don’t feel fluid.
  • Cards seem like they can be either really good, pointless or overpowered.
  • Takes ages to get coins for cards.
  • No voice work except for calling out the score.
  • Stutters in places.
  • Career mode is very generic and flat.
  • All you are playing for is unlocking new cards.
  • The general movement is Sluggish.
  • Only one control layout and no way to rebind.

Tennis World Tour 2 Review (Xbox Series S)

  • 7/10
    Graphics - 7/10
  • 7/10
    Sound - 7/10
  • 6/10
    Accessibility - 6/10
  • 6/10
    Length - 6/10
  • 6/10
    Fun Factor - 6/10
6.4/10

Summary

We have had many tennis games over the years and I have played a lot of them! From tennis on the Gameboy to Virtua tennis I have been there. A lot of the older franchises are not around anymore so I’m glad to see a sequel of a game that had potential but needed more polish. Enter Tennis World 2 and it’s a game stuck in limbo. It’s not a sim and it’s not an arcade game, it’s kind of both but only the bad parts. First off it’s not a fluid fast game, it plays Sluggish and it doesn’t help that the character models are not great or that it’s hard to judge shots. To go a bit deeper the judgment of shots issue exists as the game uses a weird not fun to use a power system for shots whereby you have to time when you press and hold the button for power and all it does is make a lot of needless hassle. It never feels like you get in a flow and even with these cards you can buy (in-game currency) to improve stats temporarily, it doesn’t make it any more fun to play. Speaking of the cards, they are a simple thing and one where I would have preferred more traditional exp leveling up rather than a card with limited uses. I hope you like cards because you are only really playing for cards and coins to buy cards. There are just no incentives or hooks as the career mode is stagnant, online is quiet and the game has no actual unlock aside from the cards. The thing that just irks me is that the core tennis gameplay is bad and even using the power of a next-gen console, it runs slow and stutters a lot and overall it’s just a bland game that doesn’t even match up to much older games.

Jim Smale

Gaming since the Atari 2600, I enjoy the weirdness in games counting Densha De Go and RC De Go as my favourite titles of all time. I prefer gaming of old where buying games from a shop was a thing, Being social in person was a thing. Join me as I attempt to adapt to this new digital age!

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